Seeing the forest AND the trees

First Visit to Maui

First Visit to Maui

I was fortunate enough to tag along with my wife to the beautiful island of Maui last week as she attended a conference. I was able to take in the sights and sounds, while she had to sit at a table for nearly three days and learn about federal credit union operations. But hey, what better place to be, right?

This was our first time to Maui and it is an unbelievable place; definitely on the list of places to return to. After my wife’s conference, we spent an extra day and a half touring the island and taking in the sights. One of the most popular things to do in Maui is travel the road to Hana. This is an all-day affair, traveling along twists and turns around the island, so we thought that we would just drive a portion of it. After about thirty or forty minutes into our drive, we come across some very odd trees, trees that we have never seen before. These trees are known as eucalyptus deglupta trees, commonly known as the rainbow eucalyptus. Apparently, it is the only Eucalyptus species found naturally in the Northern Hemisphere. These trees have a unique multi-colored bark and at different times, patches of the outer bark are shed once a year revealing a bright green inner bark. This inner bark then darkens and ages to give blue, purple, orange and then maroon tones.

Seeing the forest AND the trees.

Seeing the forest AND the trees.

Seeing these trees caused me to reflect on the work that I do as a career coach. I was born and raised in North Carolina and I am used to seeing a plethora of pine trees and even dogwood trees. Seeing the rainbow eucalyptus trees and how stunning they were made a lasting impression on me. They are unique, they stand out, and they are memorable. You can see where I am going with this…in a forest full of job seekers (your competition), how unique and memorable are you? Do you stand out? Even though there are many trees in this picture, each rainbow eucalyptus tree is unique; each has its own pattern. This would also be true of pine trees and dogwood trees, but here in North Carolina, I am used to seeing them and overlook any differences.

So, how can you apply this to your personal job search? Employers are looking for the needle in the haystack, the round peg that fits in the round hole. For you, the job seeker, you should work on identifying why you are different. Help the employer find you and quickly surmise your uniqueness. Be a unique rainbow eucalyptus tree in a forest of rainbow eucalyptus trees. Better yet, be a unique rainbow eucalyptus tree in a forest of pine trees. This is sure to catch an employer’s attention. Just make sure your uniqueness is relevant and beneficial to your potential employer and the company.

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